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Der Teilzeitmann

Markus Theunert

The project DER TEILZEITMANN [The Part-Time Man] was financed by the Federal Office for Gender Equality (EBG) between 2012 and 2014. In 2015, the EBG funded a pilot project to bring our campaign to the French-speaking part of Switzerland.

The project DER TEILZEITMANN was off to a great start right from the get-go: the largest Swiss media outlets all noted the November 2012 launch. The board of männer.ch/masculinities.ch had selected quite a sizeable goal for the initial phase of the campaign: by, 2020, 20% of employed men and fathers in Switzerland ought to be working part-time only.

The project lead is männer.ch/masculinities.ch, with Andy Keel and Jürg Wiler serving as co-directors. The project owes much of its impact to the preparations Andy Keel undertook over the course of many years. With impressive dedication and on a volunteer basis only, Andy established the platform www.teilzeit- karriere.ch and grew it into the largest jobseeking platform for part-time positions in Switzerland. DER TEILZEITMANN is embedded in this platform, providing both educational resources and services for jobseekers. The project targets men looking for part-time work as well as businesses. We frequently take DER TEILZEITMANN on the road to visit company offices and provide information, showcase part-time work models, and spark interest in changing established working time models.

Zytglogge Verlag published a book about DER TEILZEITMANN in 2014 when the project concluded its work in the German-speaking part of Switzerland.

It would be difficult to determine how many men were inspired to reduce their working hours as a result of the campaign. However, we can observe that, since the launch of the campaign DER TEILZEITMANN, the number of men working only part-time has increased more than ever before. This trend is evident in the plot pictured below; the data is taken from the Federal Office of Statistics. In 2015, the share of men working part-time is at 16.4%, or approximately 403.000 men.